(2017Translation) 宗室豐山守

From 장서각위키
Jump to: navigation, search


Original Script

宗室豐山守。愚騃不辨菽麥。家養鵝鴨。而不知算計。惟以雙雙而數之。一日家僮烹食一鴨。宗室數至雙雙。而餘一隻。乃大怒杖僕曰。汝偸我鴨。必償他鴨。翌日僮又烹食一鴨。宗室數至雙雙。而無餘隻。乃大喜曰。刑罰不可無也。昨夕杖僕。而僕償納之矣。《慵齋叢話.卷五》


Translation

Student 1 : Sanghoon Na


A royal kinsman, the Magistrate of P'ungsan, was so foolish that he could not distinguish beans from barley {00This might deserve a note explaining that it is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. In his house he raised geese and ducks but did not know how to calculate. He counted them only by pairs. One day a house servant boiled a duck and ate it. The royal kinsman counted all ducks by pairs, but one was left. At once he got enraged and flogged the servant, and said, "[Since] You stole my duck, you must compensate for it with another duck." The next day the servant again boiled a {%%another%%} duck and ate it. The royal kinsman counted all the ducks by pairs, and none was left. So he was greatly pleased, and said, "Punishment cannot but be indispensable. Yesterday evening I flogged the servant, and he made up for it."


<Revised Version>

A royal kinsman, the Magistrate of P'ungsan, was so foolish that he could not distinguish beans from barley[1]. In his house he raised geese and ducks but did not know how to calculate. He counted them only by pairs. One day a house servant boiled a duck and ate it. The royal kinsman counted all ducks by pairs, but one was left. At once he got enraged and flogged the servant, and said, "[Since] You stole my duck, you must compensate for it with another duck." The next day the servant again boiled another duck and ate it. The royal kinsman counted all the ducks by pairs, and none was left. So he was greatly pleased, and said, "Punishment cannot but be indispensable. Yesterday evening I flogged the servant, and he made up for it."

Student 2 : Younès M'Ghari


The Magistrate of Pungsan, member of the royal clan, was stupid and could not distinguish beans and wheat. He {%%His family%%}used to feed gooses {%%geese%%}and ducks. Yet he did not know calculation. He {%%how to count and %%} used to count them only by pairing pairs. One day, a house boy {%%one of his house boys%%} boiled a duck and ate it. The member of the royal clan {00 After the first occurrence, you can switch to a simpler expression like 'royal kinsman/clansman'00} counted by pairing pairs. There was one bird {^left^} by itself. After having done so {%%At this or Thus%%}, he was highly angry and flogged him saying: “You stole my duck. You must compensate me with another duck.” The next day, the boy, again, boiled a {%%another%%}duck and ate it. The member of the royal clan counted by pairing pairs. There was no bird left by itself. Then he happily said: “I cannot not punish you, [so] I flogged you yesterday evening.” The compensation had been accepted. {00Notice that he says 僕 not 汝 or 爾 (you)00. %%There cannot not be punishments (i.e., One cannot do without punishments.) Last night I flogged the house boy and the house boy compensated it by proffering another.%%}

Student 3 : Petra Sváková


A royal kinsman, the Magistrate of P'ungsan was [so] stupid [that] he did not distinguish beans and barley1. [His] family was raising geese and ducks but he did not know how to count. He [could] count them only by pairs. One day a servant boiled and ate one duck. The royal kinsman was counting [them by] pairs but [there] was left one duck [which did not have a pair]. In an instant, [the magistrate] got very furious and he flogged his servant [while] saying: "You stole my duck, so you have to compensate me with another duck, [that is] for sure." The next day, the servant boiled and ate another duck again. The royal kinsman counted [them by] pairs but [this time there] was no duck left [without a pair]. [The magistrate] was delighted and he said: "We could not do without punishment. Yesterday I flogged the servant and [see] he has [already] compensated it by giving [me another duck]."

1 不辨菽麥 is a Korean idiomatic expression which refers to someone who is stupid, fool etc.

Student 4 : (Write your name)


A royal kinsman, the Magistrate of P'ungsan, an idiot, could not tell apart beans and barley {00 A note would be needed to explain that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. The household [of the magistrate] raised geese and ducks and [he] did not know how to count and calculate. [He] only by pairing pairs, counted them.

One day a young male servant of the household boiled and ate a duck.

The royal kinsman counted through [the geese and ducks] by pairing the pairs, and left over one duck. Immediately [he was] greatly angered and beat {00杖 is quite specific to flogging00} the servant, saying: "You stole [one of] my duck[s], [you] must compensate [me] another duck."

The next day the servant again boiled and ate a duck.

The magistrate paired up the pairs and counted, and left over none. Immediately greatly cheered, [he] said: "It's not possible without punishment – yesterday evening [I] beat the servant, thereby the servant compensated [me] and proffered it."


Edited Sections:

A royal kinsman, the Magistrate of P'ungsan, an idiot, could not tell apart beans and barley.1

1 In Korean, not being able to distinguish between beans and barley is an idiomatic way to call a person unintelligent, and in modern usage, the word sukmaek (K: 숙맥; C: 索麥) is a way to describe such a person.

The royal kinsman counted through [the geese and ducks] by pairing the pairs, and left over one duck. Immediately [he was] greatly angered and flogged2 the servant, saying: "You stole [one of] my duck[s], [you] must compensate [me] another duck."

2 杖 (K: chang; C: zhang), to flog with a cane or stick.

Student 5 : (Jae Yong Chang)


The magistrate of Pungsan-gun, a member of the royal clan, was so stupid that he could not distinguish between beans and barley {00 A note would be needed to explain that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. His family raised geese and ducks. He did not know how to calculate them. Only by pairs were he able to calculate them. A {%%One%%}day, a house servant boiled and ate a duck. The royal keen {%%kinsman%%} calculated his ducks pair by pair. But there was a single duck left. [He]got angry and flogged his servant saying,“You stole my duck! You must compensate it with another.” The next day, the servant again boiled and ate a duck. The royal keen calculated his ducks pair by pair. There was no single duck left. Then he was really happy saying,“It is impossible to avoid physical punishment. Last night I flogged him. He compensated the loss.”

Student 6 : (Goeun Lee)


The magistrate of Pungsan county, a member of the royal clan, was so foolish that he could not distinguish between beans and barley {00 A note would be needed to explain that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. His family raised gees and ducks yet he did not know how to count them. Only by pairs were he able to count them. One day, a house servant boiled a duck and ate it. The royal keen {%%kinsman%%} counted his ducks pair by pair but there was a single duck left [out of all those pairs]. By this, he was greatly enraged and flogged his servant saying, “You stole my duck! You must compensate it with another one.” The next day, the servant again boiled a duck and ate it. The royal keen {%%kinsman%%} counted his ducks pair by pair; then there was no single duck left out. By this, he was greatly delighted and said, “It is impossible to avoid corporal punishment. Last night I flogged him, then he has compensated the loss right away.”


Student 7 : (Write your name)


The magistrate of P’ungsan, a royal kinsman, was so stupid and foolish so {%%that%%} he couldn’t have distinguished beans from wheat {00 A note would be needed to explain that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. He {%%His family%%} used to feed geese and ducks at the house {00"at the house" would likely be 於其家"00}, but he was unable to count and calculated {%%count%%}, so he only paired pairs in order to count them. One day a young servant of the house boiled and eats {%%ate%%}a duck. When the {^royal^} kinsman counts {%%counted%%} it by paring pairs one remains single {%%remained by itself%%}. The {^royal^}kinsman was very angry and beat {%%flogged%%} the servant saying: “you stole me a duck {%%stole my duck%%}, you have to repay me one!” The next day the servant boiled and eats {%%ate%%} again another duck and the {^royal^} kinsman paired pairs to count geese and ducks no one remain {%%remained%%}alone. So the {^royal^} kinsman was very happy and said: “Punishment cannot be avoided, yesterday I beat {%%flogged%%} the servant and then he repays me a duck".

Student 8 : Bryan Sauvadet


宗室豐山守。

The Magistrate of P’ungsan was a member of the royal family.


愚騃不辨菽麥。

He was foolish {^and^} stupid and could not distinguish beans and wheat {00Add a note that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}.


家養鵝鴨。

In his domain {%%house%%}, He brings up goose and duck {%%they brought up geese and ducks%%}.


而不知算計。

Then, He don’t {%%didn't%%}know how count them.


惟以雙雙而數之。

He only, by pairing pairs, counted them {%%counted them only by pairing pairs%%}.


一日家僮烹食一鴨。

One day, a servant boy boiled a duck and ate it.


宗室數至雙雙。

The member of the royal family counted them by pairing pairs,


而餘一隻。

And, it was remaining one duck {%%there remained one duck [without a pair]%%}.

乃大怒杖僕曰。

Then, He fell into a fit of rage, flogged the servant and said:


汝偸我鴨。

« You stole my duck.


必償他鴨。

You must compensate me with another duck.”


翌日僮又烹食一鴨。

The next day, the servant boy, again, boiled one {%%another%%} duck and ate it.


宗室數至雙雙。

The member of the royal family counted them by pairing pairs,


而無餘隻。

There was no poultry who remain {%%bird left without a pair%%}.


乃大喜曰。

Then, He was really happy and said:


刑罰不可無也昨夕杖僕。

« I cannot punish you now {%%I cannot do without punishment%%}. I flogged you {%%the servant%%} yesterday evening,


而僕償納之矣。

So the compensation is accepted {%%and the servant compensated by proffering another%% 00He was still talking about the event00}. »

Student 9 : HeeJin Lee


The magistrate of P'ungsan, a royal kinsman. [He was] a fool [who could] not 'distinguish beans from barley {00Add a note explaining that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. [His] family raised geese and ducks. But [he] did not know [how to] count. [He] only used pairs and counted them. One day the house servant boiled and ate one duck. The royal kinsman counted through the pairs. But [there was] one bird left out {^without a pair^}. And so [he, in] great anger flogged the servant and said [,] you stole my duck [,] you must pay back [with] another duck. The next day the servant again boiled and ate one duck. The royal kinsman counted through the pairs. And there [was] no bird left over. And so [he] said [in] great joy, it is {%%was%%}not possible not to punish [the servant]. Last night [I] flogged the servant, and the servant repaid and submitted it [(the {%%another%%} bird)].

Student 10 : Jelena Gledić


The magistrate of P’ungsan, a royal kinsman, was so dim that he could not tell the difference between beans and grains. His household raised geese and ducks, but he did not know how to count so he tallied them in pairs. One day a houseboy cooked and ate a duck. The royal kinsman tallied the animals in pairs, but one was missing. He immediately got enraged and caned the servant saying: “You stole my duck, you must repay me with another duck.” The following day the boy again cooked and ate one duck. The royal kinsman tallied the animals in pairs, and none were missing. He then said with great joy: “Punishments cannot be foregone. Last night I caned the servant, and the servant complied and repaid me.” “Yongjae ch’onghwa, scroll five”

Student 11 : (Write your name)



Student 12 : (Write your name)


A royal kinsman, the Magistrate of P’ungsan was very stupid not enough to tell the difference between beans and barely. His household raised geese and ducks, but he did not know how to count them. He only counted them in pairs. One day, a young servant boiled and ate a duck. When the Magistrate counted in pairs, but there was one left. Then, he was enraged and flogged the servant and said, “You stole my duck and you must pay back with another duck.” Next day, the servant boiled and ate a duck again. The Magistrate counted in pairs and there was nothing left. Then, he rejoiced and said, “It is not possible without any punishment. Yesterday, in the evening, I flogged him and he made up for it.”

Student 13 : Ra YeonJae


The magistrate of P’ungsan, a royal kinsman, was (so) stupid and stupid {%%dense%%} that could not distinguish the bean and the barely(wheat) {00Add a note to explain that this is an idiomatic expression in Korean00}. In his house, {^they^} raised ducks and geese, but did not know how to count, but only by counting them as pair and pair {00 This works too--how about 'pair by pair'?00}. One day, a servant boiled one duck and ate it. Magistrate counted pair and pair (as usual), but one was left {^without a air^}. Therefore, he was so angry and flogged a servant. He said, “you stole my duck, so you have to repay {^me^} with another duck.” Next day, a servant ate one duck (again). Magistrate counted pair and pair, but no one of pair {%%without a pair%%} left. He felt delightful and said, “punishment cannot be nothing {%%avoided / absent%%}. I flogged a {%%the%%} servant last night, and he repaid and submitted the {%%another%%} duck to me.”
  1. 不辨菽麥(불변숙맥): It is an idiomatic expression in Korean to refer to someone who is a fool. If you call someone Sungmaek(菽麥), you are indicating that you think they are not at all sensible and show a lack of good judgment.